Large and in charge: What the COVID-19 pandemic teaches us.

Let’s face it: the Coronavirus pandemic rocked our world, but it shouldn’t have. I mean, it’s not the first time something like this has happened to the body of humanity. We all studied the Black Death, the plague that wiped out roughly half of the world’s population in the Middle Ages, and this was just …

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We haven’t changed much

The remains of the past have long fascinated the thinking men and women of the present, for a very good reason. The period of cultural history known as the Renaissance, which began in Italy in roughly the 14th century and catalyzed fresh thoughts throughout the rest of Europe through the 17th century, largely took its …

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Lost in a Busy World

There is a game called by many different names that is played around the world. Where I grew up we called it "Operator." The game is simple, but revealing. One person whispers a message to another and the message is passed through the entire group until it reaches the last player, who then announces the …

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The Courage to Face Ingratitude XII

"Ingratitude is manifest in three degrees of intensity in the world... The first phase, the simplest and most common, is that of thoughtless thanklessness... The second phase of ingratitude is denial, a positive sin, not the mere negation of thanklessness... The third phase of ingratitude is treachery, where selfishness grows vindictive... These three—thanklessness, denial and …

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Momentary or Momentous

Would you say that your thoughts, words and deeds are more often momentary or momentous? Are they fleeting and brief or sustainable and significant? How large is your perspective on life? Is it narrowly focused in relation to the circumstances right before your eyes or is it more expansive, with an eye for the "big …

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Dead Symbols

I am reading a book recommended by a friend called "The Culture of Classicism", written by history professor Caroline Winterer. The author notes that the book "charts how Americans over the course of the 19th century fundamentally changed their relationship with classical antiquity, seeking in the remote past new guides for modern life." The late …

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